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geekfanhumor:

Past Meets Present

geekfanhumor:

Past Meets Present

Source: geekfanhumor
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havemanymonkeys:

Good to know for planning reasons, continued and updated.

Neilsen has handily revamped their lists.

(via thefictionaffair)

Source: nielsentopten.com
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that-big-gay-impala:

THE SARCASM IN THIS POST IN LETHAL

(via thefictionaffair)

Source: teallikethecolor
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hugr:

tastefullyoffensive:

"My dog hates having his picture taken." -lawsonj123

This dog is my spirit animal.

(via the-ultimate-time-lord)

Source: tastefullyoffensive
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dumbledorathexplora:

fuckyeahzarry:

germany won because of this kid

image

is that eren jeager

(via the-ultimate-time-lord)

Source: fuckyeahzarry
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hecallsmepineappleprincess:

redpooch:

sherlockhoelmes:

studies show there’s a 100% chance of sex if u send these to your crush on valentine’s day trust me i’m a scientist

BOP BOP BOP I’LL LET YOU TOP 

That last one has stolen my heart

(via smalljons)

Source: xaviary
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fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Today’s post continues my retrospective on mind-boggling fluid dynamics in honor of FYFD’s birthday. This video on the Kaye effect was one of the earliest submissions I ever received—if you’re reading this, thanks, Belisle!—and it completely amazed me. Judging from the frequency with which it appears in my inbox, it’s delighted a lot of you guys as well. The Kaye effect is observed in shear-thinning, non-Newtonian fluids, like shampoo or dish soap, where viscosity decreases as the fluid is deformed. Like many viscous liquids, a falling stream of these fluids creates a heap. But, when a dimple forms on the heap, a drop in the local viscosity can cause the incoming fluid jet to slip off the heap and rebound upward. As demonstrated in the video, it’s even possible to create a stable Kaye effect cascade down an incline. (Video credit: D. Lohse et al.)

Source: fuckyeahfluiddynamics
Video

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Today’s post continues my retrospective on mind-boggling fluid dynamics in honor of FYFD’s birthday. This video on the Kaye effect was one of the earliest submissions I ever received—if you’re reading this, thanks, Belisle!—and it completely amazed me. Judging from the frequency with which it appears in my inbox, it’s delighted a lot of you guys as well. The Kaye effect is observed in shear-thinning, non-Newtonian fluids, like shampoo or dish soap, where viscosity decreases as the fluid is deformed. Like many viscous liquids, a falling stream of these fluids creates a heap. But, when a dimple forms on the heap, a drop in the local viscosity can cause the incoming fluid jet to slip off the heap and rebound upward. As demonstrated in the video, it’s even possible to create a stable Kaye effect cascade down an incline. (Video credit: D. Lohse et al.)

Source: fuckyeahfluiddynamics
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djtrimal:

*watches Netflix

*looks at clock

image

*watches Netflix

(via the-ultimate-time-lord)

Source: djtrimal
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